Center for Trustworthy Technology

The Industry Imperative for Responsible and Trustworthy AI

image of farming using or with help of AI.

Rapid advances in artificial intelligence (AI) necessitate robust and equitable legal frameworks to govern emerging tools across various industries. The current, underdeveloped state of AI laws provides unexpected freedoms that can spur innovation, but these gaps also leave industries facing significant risks and uncertainties.

According to a recent Deloitte review of more than 1,600 regulations and policies from 69 countries ,  integrating AI is challenging as policymakers seek to understand the rapidly evolving technology. With a foundational understanding in place, nations typically proceed by developing national AI strategies. Finally, as the AI industry matures, governments shift their focus towards shaping its trajectory. They implement mechanisms like voluntary standards or specific regulations to guide the responsible development and application of AI. These steps ensure that AI’s development aligns with broader societal goals and ethical standards. However, numerous challenges are emerging from the rapid development of core AI capabilities, with regulatory tools being stretched beyond their capabilities and struggling to keep pace.

Despite the accelerated pace of legislation driven by the urgent need to address AI’s extensive influence, enacting laws is time-consuming. Meanwhile, the societal harms are immediate and significant. These are not only consumer-related issues but also include significant risks for corporations. A survey conducted by the Financial Times Moral Money Readers highlights this concern: 52% of organizations identified the loss of consumer trust as the most significant risk stemming from irresponsible AI use, while 43% pointed to legal challenges AI laws and regulations are not keeping pace with the technology’s exponential growth, and this regulatory vacuum creates risks for AI systems, causing unintended harm and entrenching biases.  For instance, an area where AI laws are being tested is the realm of copyright and intellectual property. A spate of lawsuits is starting to define how copyright law should handle AI systems trained on vast troves of online data, including copyrighted material. From cases against AI art generators to disputes over AI-generated music, courts are grappling with fundamental questions about the originality of AI creations, liability for infringement, and what constitutes fair use. AI is a continuously evolving technology. Therefore, its underlying principles require constant evaluation and monitoring to remain robust and appropriate.

Investing in trustworthy AI practices, even without regulatory mandates, is increasingly proving to be beneficial for industries. Companies that adopt responsible AI approaches in the current milieu not only foster consumer trust and enhance their reputation but also gain a competitive advantage. This proactive stance eases adaptation to future regulations and reduces legal risks. Additionally, by setting examples in ethical AI, companies can influence industry standards and public policy. Such leadership in the evolving tech landscape not only supports sustainable business growth but also strengthens corporate integrity.

A survey conducted by BCG and MIT, which included 1,240 participants from organizations with annual revenues exceeding $100 million, reveals nuanced findings about the implementation of responsible artificial intelligence (RAI). These organizations spanned 59 industries across 87 countries. The survey showed that companies with CEOs actively participating in Responsible AI (RAI) initiatives experience 58% more business benefits than those with less engaged CEOs. Additionally, organizations with directly involved CEOs are more likely to invest in RAI, with 39% doing so compared to only 22% of companies with hands-off CEOs.

Given these unprecedented issues, how should the industry address AI?

The imperative for the industry is clear: to advocate for and actively participate in shaping policies that keep pace with AI’s rapid evolution. Corporations must not only comply with existing regulations but also play a crucial role in forming the next generation of standards that can genuinely safeguard the public and the marketplace. This involves engaging with policymakers, contributing to public discussions, and leading by example in implementing ethical AI practices.

Moreover, the corporate sector should invest in AI literacy and ethics training across all levels of their organizations. This will equip their teams to better understand the implications of AI deployments and foster a culture of responsibility. By doing so, they can mitigate risks and enhance trust among consumers and stakeholders, which is vital for sustained business success.

Another critical factor is transparency. Companies must be open about how they use AI, the data it processes, and the decision-making processes involved. Such transparency not only builds consumer trust but also sets a benchmark for regulatory compliance, anticipating future legal norms that might emphasize open AI ecosystems.

Lastly, the industry must support research and innovation in AI governance technologies. Tools that can monitor, audit, and report on AI activities automatically will be essential in managing the scale of deployments and ensuring compliance with evolving laws and standards.

Navigating this complex landscape requires a proactive stance from the industry. By leading the charge in responsible AI practices, the corporate sector not only protects itself from potential pitfalls but also contributes to the broader goal of ensuring that AI technology benefits all of society. This balanced approach will be crucial as we venture further into this technological frontier, where AI’s capabilities continue to expand and challenge our traditional understanding of regulation and control.

Rapid advances in artificial intelligence (AI) necessitate robust and equitable legal frameworks to govern emerging tools across various industries. The current, underdeveloped state of AI laws provides unexpected freedoms that can spur innovation, but these gaps also leave industries facing significant risks and uncertainties.

According to a recent Deloitte review of more than 1,600 regulations and policies from 69 countries ,  integrating AI is challenging as policymakers seek to understand the rapidly evolving technology. With a foundational understanding in place, nations typically proceed by developing national AI strategies. Finally, as the AI industry matures, governments shift their focus towards shaping its trajectory. They implement mechanisms like voluntary standards or specific regulations to guide the responsible development and application of AI. These steps ensure that AI’s development aligns with broader societal goals and ethical standards. However, numerous challenges are emerging from the rapid development of core AI capabilities, with regulatory tools being stretched beyond their capabilities and struggling to keep pace.

Despite the accelerated pace of legislation driven by the urgent need to address AI’s extensive influence, enacting laws is time-consuming. Meanwhile, the societal harms are immediate and significant.

These are not only consumer-related issues but also include significant risks for corporations. A survey conducted by the Financial Times Moral Money Readers highlights this concern: 52% of organizations identified the loss of consumer trust as the most significant risk stemming from irresponsible AI use, while 43% pointed to legal challenges AI laws and regulations are not keeping pace with the technology’s exponential growth, and this regulatory vacuum creates risks for AI systems, causing unintended harm and entrenching biases.  For instance, an area where AI laws are being tested is the realm of copyright and intellectual property. A spate of lawsuits is starting to define how copyright law should handle AI systems trained on vast troves of online data, including copyrighted material. From cases against AI art generators to disputes over AI-generated music, courts are grappling with fundamental questions about the originality of AI creations, liability for infringement, and what constitutes fair use.  

AI is a continuously evolving technology. Therefore, its underlying principles require constant evaluation and monitoring to remain robust and appropriate.

Investing in trustworthy AI practices, even without regulatory mandates, is increasingly proving to be beneficial for industries. Companies that adopt responsible AI approaches in the current milieu not only foster consumer trust and enhance their reputation but also gain a competitive advantage. This proactive stance eases adaptation to future regulations and reduces legal risks. Additionally, by setting examples in ethical AI, companies can influence industry standards and public policy. Such leadership in the evolving tech landscape not only supports sustainable business growth but also strengthens corporate integrity.

A survey conducted by BCG and MIT, which included 1,240 participants from organizations with annual revenues exceeding $100 million, reveals nuanced findings about the implementation of responsible artificial intelligence (RAI). These organizations spanned 59 industries across 87 countries. The survey showed that companies with CEOs actively participating in Responsible AI (RAI) initiatives experience 58% more business benefits than those with less engaged CEOs. Additionally, organizations with directly involved CEOs are more likely to invest in RAI, with 39% doing so compared to only 22% of companies with hands-off CEOs.

Given these unprecedented issues, how should the industry address AI?

The imperative for the industry is clear: to advocate for and actively participate in shaping policies that keep pace with AI’s rapid evolution. Corporations must not only comply with existing regulations but also play a crucial role in forming the next generation of standards that can genuinely safeguard the public and the marketplace. This involves engaging with policymakers, contributing to public discussions, and leading by example in implementing ethical AI practices.

Moreover, the corporate sector should invest in AI literacy and ethics training across all levels of their organizations. This will equip their teams to better understand the implications of AI deployments and foster a culture of responsibility. By doing so, they can mitigate risks and enhance trust among consumers and stakeholders, which is vital for sustained business success.

Another critical factor is transparency. Companies must be open about how they use AI, the data it processes, and the decision-making processes involved. Such transparency not only builds consumer trust but also sets a benchmark for regulatory compliance, anticipating future legal norms that might emphasize open AI ecosystems.

Lastly, the industry must support research and innovation in AI governance technologies. Tools that can monitor, audit, and report on AI activities automatically will be essential in managing the scale of deployments and ensuring compliance with evolving laws and standards.

Navigating this complex landscape requires a proactive stance from the industry. By leading the charge in responsible AI practices, the corporate sector not only protects itself from potential pitfalls but also contributes to the broader goal of ensuring that AI technology benefits all of society. This balanced approach will be crucial as we venture further into this technological frontier, where AI’s capabilities continue to expand and challenge our traditional understanding of regulation and control.

Related Blogs

Scroll to Top